Call for Abstract

International Conference on Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Physics , will be organized around the theme “Cutting edges of physics for new Innovation and Discovery”

MolecularPhysics 2018 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in MolecularPhysics 2018

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

Quantum Physics is a science of the very small. Quantum mechanics describes the behaviour of matter and its relations by energy on the scale of atoms and subatomic particles. By distinction, classical physics only explains matter and energy on a scale conversant to human experience, including the behaviour of astronomical bodies such as the Moon. Classical physics is still used in ample of modern science and technology. However, towards the end of the nineteenth century, scientists discovered occurrences in both the large (macro) and the small (micro) worlds that classical physics could not explain. Coming to terms with these limits led to two major revolutions in physics which created a shift in the original scientific model the theory of relativity and the development of quantum mechanics. Quantum Magnetism

  • Track 1-1Quantum Phase Transitions
  • Track 1-2Quantum Materials
  • Track 1-3Quantum State
  • Track 1-4Quantum Optics

Quantum optics is a field of research that uses semi-classical and quantum-mechanical physics to investigate phenomena involving light and its interactions with matter at submicroscopic levels. According to quantum theory, light may be considered not only as an electro-magnetic wave but also as a "stream" of particles called photons which travel with c, the vacuum speed of light. These particles should not be considered to be classical billiard balls, but as quantum mechanical particles described by a wavefunction spread over a finite region. Each particle carries one quantum of energy, equal to hf, where h is Planck's constant and f is the frequency of the light. That energy possessed by a single photon corresponds exactly to the transition between discrete energy levels in an atom (or other system) that emitted the photon; material absorption of a photon is the reverse process. Einstein's explanation of spontaneous emission also predicted the existence of stimulated emission, the principle upon which the laser rests. However, the actual invention of the maser (and laser) many years later was dependent on a method to produce a population inversion.

  • Track 2-1Optical Coherence
  • Track 2-2Quantum Optoelectronics
  • Track 2-3Quantum states of light
  • Track 2-4Quantum Sensors
  • Track 2-5Quantum Lasers

Atomic Physics is the study of atoms and the arrangement of electrons.  It mostly considers atom an isolated system that consists of atomic nucleus encircled by electrons and the arrangement is concerned with processes such as excitation by photons and ionization or collisions with atomic particles. It has led to important applications in medicine, lasers, communications, etc. and also providing a testing ground for Quantum Theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and its derivatives.

  • Track 3-1Atomic Materials
  • Track 3-2Atomic Energy
  • Track 3-3Atomic Structure
  • Track 3-4Quantum mechanical model
  • Track 3-5Rutherford model of atom

Atomic and Molecular physics is the study of atoms and molecules and it is also the field of specialization in the physics. Atomic physicists study single ions and atoms while a molecular physicist even investigates very small molecules that are in their gaseous form. Atomic physicists study isolated and separated ions as well as atoms along with the excitation and electron arrangements. Addition to this the electronic excitation states which are known from the atoms and molecules which are able to rotate and as well as to vibrate. These kind of rotations and vibrations are quantized so that, there are also discrete energy levels. Therefore, the smallest energy differences exist between the different rotational states and the pure rotational spectra are far from the infrared region in which the wavelength is about 30 - 150 µm of the electromagnetic spectrum. Vibrational spectra are near to the infrared which is about 1 - 5 µm and thus the spectra resulting from electronic transitions which are mostly the ultraviolet regions.

  • Track 4-1Atomic spectroscopy
  • Track 4-2Atomics of optical science
  • Track 4-3Molecular optical sciences
  • Track 4-4Molecular physics
  • Track 4-5Nuclear wave theory

Molecular astrophysics, developed into a rigorous field of investigation by theoretical astrochemist Alexander Dalgarno beginning in 1967, concerns the study of emission from molecules in space. There are 110 currently known interstellar molecules. These molecules have large numbers of observable transitions. Lines may also be observed in absorption—for example the highly redshifted lines seen against the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS1830-211. High energy radiation, such as ultraviolet light, can break the molecular bonds which hold atoms in molecules. In general then, molecules are found in cool astrophysical environments. The most massive objects in our galaxy are giant clouds of molecules and dust known as giant molecular clouds. In these clouds, and smaller versions of them, stars and planets are formed. One of the primary fields of study of molecular astrophysics is star and planet formation. Molecules may be found in many environments, however, from stellar atmospheres to those of planetary satellites. Most of these locations are relatively cool, and molecular emission is most easily studied via photons emitted when the molecules make transitions between low rotational energy states.

  • Track 5-1Electromagnetic spectrum
  • Track 5-2Molecules and Photons – Spectroscopy and Collisions
  • Track 5-3Diatomic molecules
  • Track 5-4Lasers, light beams and light pulses
  • Track 5-5Optical BLOCH Equations

Molecular nanotechnology (MNT) is a technology based on the ability to build structures to complex, atomic specifications by means of mechanosynthesis.This is distinct from nanoscale materials. Based on Richard Feynman's vision of miniature factories using nanomachines to build complex products (including additional nanomachines), this advanced form of nanotechnology (or molecular manufacturing would make use of positionally-controlled mechanosynthesis guided by molecular machine systems. MNT would involve combining physical principles demonstrated by biophysics, chemistry, other nanotechnologies, and the molecular machinery of life with the systems engineering principles found in modern macroscale factories.

  • Track 6-1Smart materials and nanosensors
  • Track 6-2Replicating nanorobots
  • Track 6-3Phased-array optics
  • Track 6-4Medical nanorobots
  • Track 6-5Utility fog

Plasma is used to describe a comprehensive variety of macroscopically neutral substances containing many interacting free electrons and ionized atoms or molecules, which exhibit collective behavior due to the long-range coulomb forces. Not all media containing charged particles, but can be classified as plasmas. For a group of interacting charged and unbiased particles to reveal plasma behavior it must satisfy certain conditions, or criteria, for plasma existence. Although plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium are found in many places in nature, as is the case for many astrophysical types of plasma, they are not very common in the laboratory. Plasmas can also be generated by ionization processes that raise the degree of ionization much above its thermal properties. There are many different methods of creating plasmas in the laboratory and, depending on the method, the plasma may have a high or low density, high or low temperature, it may be steady or transient, stable or unstable, etc.

  • Track 7-1Thermal plasma
  • Track 7-2Neutral plasma
  • Track 7-3Collisional plasma
  • Track 7-4Magnetic plasma
  • Track 7-5Complex plasma

Optoelectronics is the study and application of electronic devices and systems that source, detect and control light, usually considered a sub-field of photonics. In this context, light often includes invisible forms of radiation such as gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet and infrared, in addition to visible light. Optoelectronic devices are electrical-to-optical or optical-to-electrical transducers, or instruments that use such devices in their operation. Electro-optics is often erroneously used as a synonym, but is a wider branch of physics that concerns all interactions between light and electric fields, whether or not they form part of an electronic device. Optoelectronics is based on the quantum mechanical effects of light on electronic materials, especially semiconductors, sometimes in the presence of electric fields

  • Track 8-1Optoelectronic Devices and Materials
  • Track 8-2Semiconductor Materials and Applications
  • Track 8-3Optoelectronic Instrumentation, Measurement and Metrology
  • Track 8-4Nano-optoelectronics
  • Track 8-5Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits

Photonics is the physical science of light (photon) generation, detection, and manipulation through emission, transmission, modulation, signal processing, switching, amplification, and etection/sensing. Though covering all light's technical applications over the whole spectrum, most photonic applications are in the range of visible and near-infrared light. A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. Lasers are distinguished from other light sources by their coherence. Spatial coherence is typically expressed through the output being a narrow beam, which is diffraction-limited. Laser beams can be focused to very tiny spots, achieving a very high irradiance, or they can have very low divergence in order to concentrate their power at a great distance.

  • Track 9-1Semiconductor Lasers and Laser Dynamics
  • Track 9-2Photomedicine and Laser Surgery
  • Track 9-3Graphene and 2D materials
  • Track 9-4Photonic Crystal Materials and Devices
  • Track 9-5Biophotonics and Neurophotonics

Solid-state physics is deals with firm matter through mediums like crystallography, metallurgy, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics. It is one of the major branches of condensed matter physics. It considers how the large-scale properties of solid materials result from their atomic scale properties and it studies properties of materials such as heat capacity and electrical conduction. This track synthesis, modern research topics like quasi-crystals, Spin glass, strongly correlated materials.

  • Track 10-1Crystallography
  • Track 10-2Strongly correlated electronic systems
  • Track 10-3Quasicrystals
  • Track 10-4Electromagnetism
  • Track 10-5Quantum Mechanics

Modern particle physics research is focused on subatomic particles, including atomic constituents such as electrons, protons, and neutrons (protons and neutrons are composite particles called baryons, made of quarks), produced by radioactive and scattering processes, such as photons, neutrinos, and muons, as well as a wide range of exotic particles. Dynamics of particles is also governed by quantum mechanics; they exhibit wave–particle duality, displaying particle-like behaviour under certain experimental conditions and wave-like behaviour in others. In more technical terms, they are described by quantum state vectors in a Hilbert space, which is also treated in quantum field theory. Following the convention of particle physicists, the term elementary particle is applied to those particles that are, according to current understanding, presumed to be indivisible and not composed of other particles. Nuclear physics is the field of physics that studies the constituents and interactions of atomic nuclei. The most commonly known applications of nuclear physics are nuclear power generation and nuclear weapons technology, but the research has provided application in many fields, including those in nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging, ion implantation in materials engineering, and radiocarbon dating in geology and archaeology.

  • Track 11-1Satellite Orbits Models & Methods
  • Track 11-2Elementary particles
  • Track 11-3Cosmic rays for particle and astroparticle physics
  • Track 11-4Statistical methods in particle physics experiments
  • Track 11-5Particle Physics Phenomenology

In Nano-scale Physics, the application of nanotechnology of scientific knowledge to measure, create, pattern, manipulate, utilize or incorporate materials and components. It is of wider significance that the power of nanotechnology has enabled complexity to be understood at ever smaller scales, which is helping humanity to understand the specific basis of some of the oldest and most intractable of technologies, such as those involved in food and medicine. In Nano-scale the detail nanostructural is microstructure and to describe nanostructures it is necessary to distinguish between the numbers of dimensions in the volume of an object. The surfaces have one dimension on the nanoscale are called Nanotextured surfaces. In biology Nanoscale structure is often called as ultrastructure. In physics, the properties of nanoscale objects and ensembles of these objects are widely studied.

  • Track 12-1Nanomaterials
  • Track 12-2Nano Structures
  • Track 12-3Nano Electronic devices
  • Track 12-4Spectroscopy of Nano-Structures
  • Track 12-5Mesoscopic World

Chemical physics is a sub field of chemistry and physics that investigates physicochemical phenomena using techniques from molecular and atomic physics and condensed matter physics; it is the branch of physics that studies chemical processes from the point of perspective of physics. While at the interface of physics and chemistry, chemical physics is distinct from physical chemistry in that it focuses more on the typical elements and theories of physics. Meanwhile, physical chemistry observes the physical nature of chemistry. Nonetheless, the distinction between the two fields is vague, and workers usually practice in both fields during the course of their research. Chemical physics is a sub field of chemistry and physics that investigates physicochemical phenomena using techniques from molecular and atomic physics and condensed matter physics; it is the branch of physics that studies chemical processes from the point of perspective of physics. While at the interface of physics and chemistry, chemical physics is distinct from physical chemistry in that it focuses more on the typical elements and theories of physics.

  • Track 13-1Electromagnetism
  • Track 13-2Nuclear and Particle Physics
  • Track 13-3Quantum Mechanics and Symmetry
  • Track 13-4Superconductivity
  • Track 13-5Hydrodynamics

Molecular modelling encompasses all methods, theoretical and computational, used to model or mimic the behaviour of molecules. The methods are used in the fields of computational chemistry, drug design, computational biology and materials science to study molecular systems ranging from small chemical systems to large biological molecules and material assemblies. The simplest calculations can be performed by hand, but inevitably computers are required to perform molecular modelling of any reasonably sized system. The common feature of molecular modelling methods is the atomistic level description of the molecular systems. This may include treating atoms as the smallest individual unit (a molecular mechanics approach), or explicitly modelling electrons of each atom (a quantum chemistry approach).

  • Track 14-1Molecular mechanics
  • Track 14-2Computational chemistry
  • Track 14-3Drug design
  • Track 14-4computational biology
  • Track 14-5materials science

Molecular engineering is an emerging field of study concerned with the design and testing of molecular properties, behavior and interactions in order to assemble better materials, systems, and processes for specific functions. This approach, in which observable properties of a macroscopic system are influenced by direct alteration of a molecular structure, falls into the broader category of “bottom-up” design.Molecular engineering deals with material development efforts in emerging technologies that require rigorous rational molecular design approaches towards systems of high complexity. Molecular engineering is highly interdisciplinary by nature, encompassing aspects of chemical engineering, materials science, bioengineering, electrical engineering, physics, mechanical engineering, and chemistry. There is also considerable overlap with nanotechnology, in that both are concerned with the behavior of materials on the scale of nanometers or smaller. Given the highly fundamental nature of molecular interactions, there are a plethora of potential application areas, limited perhaps only by one’s imagination and the laws of physics.

  • Track 15-1Computational and Theoretical Approaches
  • Track 15-2Computational and Theoretical Approaches Microscopy
  • Track 15-3Molecular Characterization
  • Track 15-4Surface Science
  • Track 15-5Spectroscopy